A Photographic Interlude

A Photographic Interlude

It was when Mel was in Istanbul being a poet that we were able to take over the house in Foça. In addition to some watercolors of the coastline, I managed to take some photos of some beautiful waterfalls inland, up towards Manisa.

Getting there was an adventure in itself (let’s just say that anytime you’re follow the directions of someone who’s kicking himself in the head because he didn’t Google it first, you really ought to Google it first) – and I’m really not someone who can sit down and start drawing or painting a place I’ve never been to before, anyway – I like to get the feel of a place by walking around and exploring before I can really get into examining it in detail from only one place – so I decided I would take photographs instead (as well as some video, because who knows?, it might come in handy some day).

I figured out a long time ago I was not going to be a professional photographer, and also that I don’t like to carry around a big, heavy camera, so I found myself a great Nikon that might not have all the options of a big ‘SLR’ – but that fits in my front pocket. It’s got a whole lot of gadgets on its ‘menu’, but it won’t let me play with apertures and focal lengths like I’d like to… so I’m sort of limited to ‘one-step-above-point-and-shoot’. Still, it gives me a record of where we’ve been to (and trust me, in this case, we’re not likely to find ourselves there again), keep some ‘digital sketches’ for whatever they might come in handy for, and occasionally act like I’m a ‘real’ photographer…

So, here is my photographic interlude:

pool at bottom of fallsShot Number 1: The Waterfall (because this is where we went)

 

harun at bottom of fallsShot Number 2: The Waterfall with Harun (because this is who I went with)

 

selfie waterfallShot Number 3: The Waterfall with Me and Harun (because a selfie is obligatory)

 

treesShot Number 4: Trees and Moss and Rocks (because I was trying to play with the focus on an auto-focus camera)

 

sepia treesShot Number 5: Trees and Moss and Rocks (because I was trying to be romantic with the sepia setting on the ‘menu’)

 

very cool waterfall poolShot Number 6: Water Falling in a Pool (because I was still trying to play with the focus on an auto-focus camera)

 

high waterfallShot Number 7: Waterfall (because it was a pretty tall waterfall after all)

 

dripsShot Number 8: Drips (because I like to crop things)

 

obliteratedxShot Number 9: Obliterated (because I like to crop things and I like Photoshop)

 

sudsShot Number 10: Suds  (because I really like to crop things and I really like Photoshop)

I hope you enjoyed this photographic interlude.
Now, get back to work!

 

 

 

Big! Bigger!! Biggest!!!

Foca landscape 4 fishing day

What a misleading title.
But then again, I think these photos are misleading, too.

Foça Fishing Day 1

When I look at them, it makes me want to make BIG paintings.
Which is kind of interesting, because I NEVER want to make big paintings.

Foca landscape 3 fishing day

But I could see making these big. At least as big as a couch painting.
A COUCH PAINTING!

Foca landscape 2 fishing day

How big do you think these are, anyway? Come on, take a guess…

Lone Fisherman

Well, at the moment, they’re big enough – or small enough – to fit in a daypack.
Which is pretty convenient when you’re out for a walk in the woods, or a stroll by the sea.

Thanks to recent technological advancements, I am seriously thinking about making these big. At least bigger than a backpack. After that I’ll just need someplace to put them.

Any takers?

Foca landscape 1 fishing day

 

But seriously, folks…

Whenever I’m asked about who has influenced me, I always think of my undergraduate printmaking professor at Washington University, Peter Marcus, and my favorite quote from him: “Make it big, do it in color, and have 100 by Friday.”

Well, I might not have had 100 by Friday, but I certainly liked doing them big and in color. We were lucky to have a very large press (Peter liked doing large prints himself), and so I was doing prints that were at just about a meter tall – just as large as the press could handle.

Back then it was mostly technology that dictated the size of my work. Nowadays it’s storage space.

Confession: While it may have been storage space that got me started doing small works, it’s the idea behind them that’s kept me going. (My friend Hüsnü used to tell people I was a conceptual painter, after all… )

I like the idea that people have to stop in front of my drawings and get up close to them to see what’s going on in them.

Not that they always do.

In fact, they mostly don’t.

But I’m stubborn, and I will continue to try to get people to pause.

And pay attention.

Buddhist mindfulness, and all that.

Heads Above Water

I think that’s going to be the title for my most recent oil pastel drawing in my series of water drawings.

Water Pastel 010416

When I was finishing this drawing, part of me wanted to paint out the white ‘waves’ so that the drawing would be just 2 disembodied heads in a field of blue.
But I kind of like that there is some consistency in how I’ve drawn water over the years.
Consider this drawing of a Bodrum landscape from a few years ago…

Pembe Sis

And then again, I thought of how the video that was part of my ‘Homesickness’ installation was also basically an image of somewhat disembodied people in the water…

inst13

Maybe it’s time to make some more videos…